Grade 5 – Charcoal Perspective

Perspective is a tough thing to teach. This is in part because of all the different ways that an artist can use to show depth in a picture. One of these ways is atmospheric perspective. This is the way that things loose contrast and clarity over distance.

In this project the grade 5s had to achieve atmospheric perspective using charcoal. The learners loved working with the messy medium! The learners had to have a moon somewhere in the background. They could use chalk pastel to give this moon some colour. They greyed out the sky using willow stick charcoal and sketched in the foreground figure as well as mid ground details (if any).

They then made the figures in the front as dark as possible using compressed charcoal. We loved this project! I would have loved to have more of the images to show as they all turned out beautifully!

Advertisements

Dragon eyes

Some more dragon eyes from the grade 5s! I did this project a few years ago and really enjoyed it. The learners were pushed to recreate the dragon’s scaly texture as well as being taught about the mechanics of an eye.

We drew it first in pencil with shading. Over this we used water colour. Finally we used fineliner to add to the contrast in essential areas.

Grade 5 – Tortoises

Tortoises are such useful animals…From an art teaching point of view that is. Their patterned shells and scaly skins are wonderful implements for teaching learners about texture and pattern!

This project was a very simple one that I found in Santam’s creative art manual. After studying and discussing various images of tortoises, the learners had to draw a tortoise using stick and ink. They could not start in pencil. This was a bit of a challenge for them as they usually start off with the very forgivable medium of pencil.

They had to include such things as the scaly texture on the legs and patterns on the shell. They then took a watered down ink and used brushes to give their tortoises a variety of greys.

Finally they took oil pastel to create a beautiful and interesting background scene. I told them that I didn’t just want grass and sky but to use their imaginations and surprise me!

Grade 5 – Hundertwasser

0201Friedensreich Hundertwasser was an Austrian architect and artist that I discovered earlier this year. I absolutely love his creations! There is a definite magical sense about them which reminds me of Gaudi. He was very eccentric who abhorred straight lines and dull colours.06I discovered a nice art project on a faithful attempt blog site. I started by giving each learner an A2 page which was cut in half longways so that what they had was an extra long piece of paper! They first did a rough draft on a piece of newsprint paper. They then drew a whole city of Hundertwasser buildings on a whimsical landscape using a pencil. This complete, I mixed black ink with school craft glue and they used a cocktail stick to draw this over the lines. It was a very laborious process but it meant that the lines were raised a bit for the next step.

0304

The next step saw the learners colouring their pictures in using water colour paints. As an extra emphasis I allowed my learners to finish it off with some brightly coloured tempera paints. This definitely added quite a lot!05

Grade 5 – Rolled up action figures!

I got this idea from an artwork I saw at the Eisteddfod art competition 2 years ago. Their one was a simple one showing figures made out of rolled up newspaper doing the Olympic events. I thought we could take that to the next level!

I found a video of a person pretending to be the character from assassins creed and doing some pretty amazing parkour through the streets of his city. I then explained to the class how a person in a dynamic position would look. I showed them how diagonal lines have more movement then vertical or horizontal ones.

They then had to create their scene! The learners had a lot of freedom in the scene they chose to create. This meant that some of the learners to a fairly long time to get on to actually working on the project at hand but it resulted in a great diversity in the art that was eventually handed in.

The learners had to create their person out of rolled up pieces of magazine paper. They could decorate the background in any way they wanted but I found that relying more on collage resulted in a more interesting artwork in the end and next time I do this project I will include this in the project instructions.

Grade 5 – 3D Pixel Pokemon

This was a very nice project and the kids really enjoyed it! They were asked to first create their own, unique Pokemon. They were then given a piece of mathematical paper (with a grid) and told to lightly draw their pokemon on this paper in pencil.

They were then shown how to transform this organic shape into one made out of square pixels. Once they had done this they were told how to make these pixels ‘3D’. They had to draw a line from each corner going diagonally left and up to the next corner of their grid paper (but not going through their Pokemon!) Once they had all of these corner bits done, they could link the corners with a line. It took a little explaining to get this process going but, once I had shown them an example or two of me doing it, the learners got it! I loved their creations!

Grade 5 – Dotty artwork

This is a very nice, simple project which the learners loved! It was also nice because the learners got to work in pairs if they wanted.

They began by learning about warm and cold colours and how warm and cold colours placed next to each other can create a lot of contrast. They then had to choose a simple picture with an animal/creature featuring in it. The initial idea was for the learners to just use a sea scene with a sea turtle and perhaps some fish but (as always) the children were not happy to be limited like that. 🙂

I had to keep reminding them of the importance of keeping their scene simple however and the importance of using either hot colours in the foreground animal etc. and cold in the background or visa versa.

We worked on an A2 piece of black paper. They began by sketching their creature and other elements. They then took paint, swirled their brush through this and then made a swirl of colour on their artwork. I showed them that mixing other colours into their base colours can create interest. For example, a purely red turtle might look a little boring compared to a red turtle with swirls of yellow into the red on the side where the sun would be hitting it and swirls of purple into the side that would be in shadow.