Grade 6 –

20170206_144633This year the grade 6s had other cultures as a soft theme in art. In celebration of Chinese new year in the first term I decided the grade 6s should make something to celebrate! I found very nice ideas online. One idea was to make a four part dragon using split pins so that it could still move.

I found images of Chinese dragons and a little video clip of the dance of the dragon taking place (they all recognized it from Kung Fu Panda). They then made their four parts of the dragon: head, two middle parts and tail. To save on paper I asked them to work in pairs. They then used off cuts to add decoration onto their dragons.

Finally we added sticks onto them so that the learners could control them!20170206_144645

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Grade 6 – 2D – 3D architecture

I got this project from the Santam art teachers manual. The lesson began with a look at architecture from around the world and a discussion around the different forms. The learners then chose a culture they liked best (out of a selection of about 5) and began designing their buildings.

The end result they were going for was a pop up artwork where the learner created 3 main buildings which popped off a flat but beautiful landscape. This years grade 6 group is very creative and always do something which surprises me.

Grade 3 – Castle in the clouds

5I have used this project a few times as I enjoy what the kids come up with. I tell the story of jack and the beanstalk and ask the kids to imagine what it must have been like if they were Jack. I ask them to close their eyes and see as their heads break through the clouds and they see this enormous castle!

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They then have to draw the castle, the beanstalk, themselves and anything else they would like in the scene. We used some black crayon to outline ourselves as well as the castle. We then used water colour paint to add colour!

I showed them how to wet the paper first for the clouds and then add the watercolour to make a beautiful, diffused colour that works great for things like clouds. We then used water colour on dry paper for the detailed spots.

Grade 5 – Rolled up action figures!

I got this idea from an artwork I saw at the Eisteddfod art competition 2 years ago. Their one was a simple one showing figures made out of rolled up newspaper doing the Olympic events. I thought we could take that to the next level!

I found a video of a person pretending to be the character from assassins creed and doing some pretty amazing parkour through the streets of his city. I then explained to the class how a person in a dynamic position would look. I showed them how diagonal lines have more movement then vertical or horizontal ones.

They then had to create their scene! The learners had a lot of freedom in the scene they chose to create. This meant that some of the learners to a fairly long time to get on to actually working on the project at hand but it resulted in a great diversity in the art that was eventually handed in.

The learners had to create their person out of rolled up pieces of magazine paper. They could decorate the background in any way they wanted but I found that relying more on collage resulted in a more interesting artwork in the end and next time I do this project I will include this in the project instructions.

Grade 5 – Dotty artwork

This is a very nice, simple project which the learners loved! It was also nice because the learners got to work in pairs if they wanted.

They began by learning about warm and cold colours and how warm and cold colours placed next to each other can create a lot of contrast. They then had to choose a simple picture with an animal/creature featuring in it. The initial idea was for the learners to just use a sea scene with a sea turtle and perhaps some fish but (as always) the children were not happy to be limited like that. 🙂

I had to keep reminding them of the importance of keeping their scene simple however and the importance of using either hot colours in the foreground animal etc. and cold in the background or visa versa.

We worked on an A2 piece of black paper. They began by sketching their creature and other elements. They then took paint, swirled their brush through this and then made a swirl of colour on their artwork. I showed them that mixing other colours into their base colours can create interest. For example, a purely red turtle might look a little boring compared to a red turtle with swirls of yellow into the red on the side where the sun would be hitting it and swirls of purple into the side that would be in shadow.